Monday, August 27, 2012

Lithium-ion Capacitors (LICs) In Wind Power Generation


Market Forecast (2011-2021)

According to ElectroniCast, the consumption value of LICs in wind power generation is forecast to reach over $150 million in 2021…


 ElectroniCast Consultants, a leading market & technology forecast consultancy, recently announced their market forecast of the worldwide consumption of lithium-ion capacitors (LICs) used in wind power (wind turbines) generation. 

ElectroniCast estimates that in 2011, the worldwide consumption value of lithium-ion capacitors used in wind power generation applications was less than $1 million. From 2016-2021, the total consumption value is forecast an increase nearly 80 percent per year, reaching over $150 million in the year 2021. Market forecast data in this study report refers to consumption for a particular calendar year; therefore, this data is not cumulative data.

A capacitor is an electrical device that stores or releases electricity through rapid electrostatic reactions. Compared with a battery that stores electricity through slow chemical reactions, a capacitor makes it possible to charge and discharge electricity almost instantaneously with a long cycle life. 

Lithium-Ion Capacitors (LICs) have a higher power density as compared to batteries and they are safer in use than Lithium-Ion Batteries (LIBs), since thermal runaway reactions may occur with LIBs. Compared to an Electric Double-Layer Capacitor (EDLC), the lithium-ion capacitor has a higher output voltage. They both have similar power densities, but energy density of a lithium-ion capacitor is higher.

Wind power is the conversion of wind energy into a useful form of energy, such as using wind turbines to make electricity.  In relationship to the use of lithium-ion capacitors, this ElectroniCast study deals mostly with small-scale wind power, which is the name given to wind generation systems with the capacity to produce up to 100 kW of electrical power. 

The future of the lithium-ion capacitor (LIC) market, despite exciting innovative devices driven by technological advances and ecological/energy-saving concerns, still face challenges in overcoming performance/price limitations and in attracting widespread consumption.  The use of LICs in wind power generation applications is increasing, initiating from government-based initiative – then to commercial/business – and eventually to the consumer-level.

The ElectroniCast market forecast of consumption is presented for two major End-User categories: Government/Commercial and Residential/Non-Specific (Other).  The Government/ Commercial category is forecast to maintain its market leadership role during the forecast period, with 91% of the worldwide market in 2011 and eventually falling to 73% as Residential/Other applications begin using the (new) solution.  There are many different sources of energy (coal, nuclear, natural gas, hydro, oil), therefore, the use of wind turbine-based products, as well as other alternative or renewable energy solutions (naturally replenished) are constantly striving to serve the needs of consumers.

For detailed information on this or other services provided by ElectroniCast, please contact Theresa Hosking, Marketing/Sales; thosking@electronicastconsultants.com  
(Telephone/USA: 707/275-9397)

ElectroniCast Consultants – www.electronicast.com specializes in forecasting trends in technology forecasting, markets and applications forecasting, strategic planning and consulting. ElectroniCast Consultants, as a technology-based independent forecasting firm, serves industrial companies, trade associations, government agencies, communication and data network companies and the financial community.  Reduction of the risk of major investment decisions is the main benefit provided.  ElectroniCast Consultants’ goal is to understand the challenges and opportunities facing clients and to provide timely, accurate information for strategic planning.

Tax Breaks for Wind Energy Companies

According to President Barack Obama's re-election campaign Mitt Romney opposes a tax cut for wind energy companies.

The renewable energy industry says that if the tax break expires, it will cost about 37,000 jobs nationally.

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Graphene Anode Material - Charged or Discharged 10 Times Faster

Batteries Made From World’s Thinnest Material Could Power Tomorrow’s Electric Cars
Engineering Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Use Intentionally Blemished Graphene Paper To Create Easy-To-Make, Quick-Charging Lithium-ion Battery With High Power Density
SEM image of the cross section of photo-thermally reduced graphene shows an expanded structure. The graphene sheets are spaced apart with an inter-connected network allowing for greater electrolyte wetting and lithium ion access for efficient high rate performance in lithium ions batteries.

Engineering researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute made a sheet of paper from the world’s thinnest material, graphene, and then zapped the paper with a laser or camera flash to blemish it with countless cracks, pores, and other imperfections. The result is a graphene anode material that can be charged or discharged 10 times faster than conventional graphite anodes used in today’s lithium (Li)-ion batteries.
Rechargeable Li-ion batteries are the industry standard for mobile phones, laptop and tablet computers, electric cars, and a range of other devices. While Li-ion batteries have a high energy density and can store large amounts of energy, they suffer from a low power density and are unable to quickly accept or discharge energy. This low power density is why it takes about an hour to charge your mobile phone or laptop battery, and why electric automobile engines cannot rely on batteries alone and require a supercapacitor for high-power functions such as acceleration and braking.

The Rensselaer research team, led by nanomaterials expert Nikhil Koratkar, sought to solve this problem and create a new battery that could hold large amounts of energy but also quickly accept and release this energy. Such an innovation could alleviate the need for the complex pairing of Li-ion batteries and supercapacitors in electric cars, and lead to simpler, better-performing automotive engines based solely on high-energy, high-power Li-ion batteries. Koratkar and his team are confident their new battery, created by intentionally engineering defects in graphene, is a critical stepping stone on the path to realizing this grand goal. Such batteries could also significantly shorten the time it takes to charge portable electronic devices from phones and laptops to medical devices used by paramedics and first responders.

“Li-ion battery technology is magnificent, but truly hampered by its limited power density and its inability to quickly accept or discharge large amounts of energy. By using our defect-engineered graphene paper in the battery architecture, I think we can help overcome this limitation,” said Koratkar, the John A. Clark and Edward T. Crossan Professor of Engineering at Rensselaer. “We believe this discovery is ripe for commercialization, and can make a significant impact on the development of new batteries and electrical systems for electric automobiles and portable electronics applications.”

Results of the study were published this week by the journal ACS Nano in the paper “Photo-thermally reduced graphene as high power anodes for lithium ion batteries.” See the paper online at: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nn303145j

Koratkar and his team started investigating graphene as a possible replacement for the graphite used as the anode material in today’s Li-ion batteries. Essentially a single layer of the graphite found commonly in our pencils or the charcoal we burn on our barbeques, graphene is an atom-thick sheet of carbon atoms arranged like a nanoscale chicken-wire fence. In previous studies, Li-ion batteries with graphite anodes exhibited good energy density but low power density, meaning they could not charge or discharge quickly. This slow charging and discharging was because lithium ions could only physically enter or exit the battery’s graphite anode from the edges, and slowly work their way across the length of the individual layers of graphene.

Koratkar’s solution was to use a known technique to create a large sheet of graphene oxide paper. This paper is about the thickness of a piece of everyday printer paper, and can be made nearly any size or shape. The research team then exposed some of the graphene oxide paper to a laser, and other samples of the paper were exposed to a simple flash from a digital camera. In both instances, the heat from the laser or photoflash literally caused mini-explosions throughout the paper, as the oxygen atoms in graphene oxide were violently expelled from the structure. The aftermath of this oxygen exodus was sheets of graphene pockmarked with countless cracks, pores, voids, and other blemishes. The pressure created by the escaping oxygen also prompted the graphene paper to expand five-fold in thickness, creating large voids between the individual graphene sheets.

The researchers quickly learned this damaged graphene paper performed remarkably well as an anode for a Li-ion battery. Whereas before the lithium ions slowly traversed the full length of graphene sheets to charge or discharge, the ions now used the cracks and pores as shortcuts to move quickly into or out of the graphene—greatly increasing the battery’s overall power density. Koratkar’s team demonstrated how their experimental anode material could charge or discharge 10 times faster than conventional anodes in Li-ion batteries without incurring a significant loss in its energy density. Despite the countless microscale pores, cracks, and voids that are ubiquitous throughout the structure, the graphene paper anode is remarkably robust, and continued to perform successfully even after more than 1,000 charge/discharge cycles. The high electrical conductivity of the graphene sheets also enabled efficient electron transport in the anode, which is another necessary property for high-power applications.

Koratkar said the process of making these new graphene paper anodes for Li-ion batteries can easily be scaled up to suit the needs of industry. The graphene paper can be made in essentially any size and shape, and the photo-thermal exposure by laser or camera flashes is an easy and inexpensive process to replicate. The researchers have filed for patent protection for their discovery. The next step for this research project is to pair the graphene anode material with a high-power cathode material to construct a full battery.
Along with Koratkar, co-authors of the paper are Rensselaer graduate students Rahul Mukherjee, Abhay Varghese Thomas, and Ajay Krishnamurthy, all of the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering (MANE).

The study was funded by the National Science Foundation, and supported by Koratkar’s John A. Clark and Edward T.Crossan Endowed Chair Professorship at Rensselaer.
Koratkar is a professor in MANE and the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Rensselaer. He is also a faculty member of the university’s Center for Future Energy Systems and the Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center.

For more information on the Koratkar’s research at Rensselaer, visit:

SOURCE LINK: http://news.rpi.edu/update.do










Monday, August 20, 2012

Lithium-Ion Capacitors in Wind Power Generation Global Market Forecast & Analysis (2011-2021)

ElectroniCast Consultants                                

 

Publish Date:             August 20, 2012
Text Pages:               239
Also Included:            Excel worksheets and PowerPoint Slides
Fee:                            US$3,200

Contact for More Information: Stephen Montgomery



This ElectroniCast report provides a 2011-2021 market forecast and analysis of the worldwide consumption of lithium-ion capacitors (LICs) used in wind power generation (wind turbine) applications.

ElectroniCast Consultants published a report specifically addressing the potential use of lithium-ion capacitors in solar photovoltaic (PV) power generation applications in December 2011; and now we are releasing this report addressing the use of lithium-ion capacitors in wind power generation applications.

A capacitor is an electrical device that stores or releases electricity through rapid electrostatic reactions. Compared with a battery that stores electricity through slow chemical reactions, a capacitor makes it possible to charge and discharge electricity almost instantaneously with a long cycle life. 

Lithium-Ion Capacitors (LICs) have a higher power density as compared to batteries and LIC’s are safer in use than Lithium-Ion Batteries (LIBs), since thermal runaway reactions may occur with the LIBs. Compared to an Electric Double-Layer Capacitor (EDLC), the lithium-ion capacitor has a higher output voltage. They both have similar power densities, but energy density of a lithium-ion capacitor is higher.

Lithium-ion capacitors contain no hazardous substances, such as heavy metals (Cadmium, Mercury or Lead) making them environmentally friendly electrical storage devices.  They are also characterized by an ability to charge with even weak current, and as a result, demand is expected to increase substantially in environmentally friendly fields such as solar power generation.

The use of lithium-ion capacitors as independent power supplies in combination with wind turbines (wind power) is considered for a wide range of devices such as off-grid power systems, water pumping/filtration systems, LED streetlights and roadway/railway signage, telecommunication equipment, surveillance cameras, security sensors and other applications.

Wind power is the conversion of wind energy into a useful form of energy, such as using wind turbines to make electricity.  In relationship to the use of lithium-ion capacitors, this study deals mostly with small-scale wind power, which is the name given to wind generation systems with the capacity to produce up to 100 kW of electrical power.  Isolated communities, which may otherwise rely on diesel generators, may use wind turbines as an alternative.

ElectroniCast analysts performed interviews (primary research) with authoritative and representative individuals concerned with the power storage industry sector, plus “renewable” (naturally replenished) energy power generating technologies (wind, solar and other), energy-efficient lighting (LEDs), consumer power-stations, migration systems of voltage sags/swells, uninterruptible power supply (UPS) devices, off-grid energy cooperatives, and many other concerns and related entities.

The future of the lithium-ion capacitor (LIC) market, despite exciting innovative devices driven by technological advances and ecological/energy-saving concerns, still face challenges in overcoming performance/price limitations and in attracting widespread consumption.  The use of LICs in wind power generation applications is increasing, initiating from government-based initiative – then to commercial/business – and eventually to the consumer-level.

On-going extensive customer demand-side and supplier-side information interviews, combined with ElectroniCast background of information and opinions in the energy efficiency solution field were the basis for estimating data to be inserted into the analysis/forecast data base spreadsheets.  Published information related to LIC and related component/applications and consumption, was reviewed, including:

  • Trade press
·        Press release information
  • Financial reports
  • Web site background information
  • Vendor production information
  • Other published information

The ElectroniCast market forecast (Excel spreadsheet) database structure used for this project is provided for insertion (and later manipulation) of quantities, prices (and thus value) for lithium-ion capacitors used in wind power generation applications for each year, in each end-user category subset of each geographical region.  This technique permits analysis for reasonableness check at all levels.  The final database/spreadsheet is the source for the various values incorporated in the tables and figures in this report and quoted in the (report) text.




Regional Market Segmentation This report provides the market data by the following regional segments and sub-regions:

·        Global (Total)
o       America
§         United States and Canada
§         Latin America
o       EMEA
§         Northern Europe
§         Southern Europe
§         Western Europe
§         Eastern Europe
§         Middle East and Africa
o       APAC
§         People’s Republic of China (PRC)
§         Japan
§         Republic of Korea (ROK)
§         Rest of APAC


The estimate of 2011 plus the market forecast (2012-2021) is presented for Lithium-Ion capacitors for use with wind power generation (wind turbines).  The Lithium-Ion capacitor (LIC) market forecast data are segmented by the following functions:

·        Consumption Value (US$, million)
·        Quantity (number/Farad: Million)
·        Average Selling Prices (ASP $, each Farad)


Nominal Capacitance - Farad (F):          The farad (symbol: F) is the SI unit of capacitance (SI is the International System of Units).  Capacitance is the ability of a capacitor to store energy in an electric field. Capacitance is also a measure of the amount of electric potential energy stored (or separated) for a given electric potential. A common form of energy storage device is a parallel-plate capacitor.

  
Market Forecast Application Categories

The ElectroniCast market forecast of consumption is presented for two major End-User categories:

·  Government/Commercial
·  Residential/Non-Specific

The market share (%) of the consumption value market forecast, by end-user group, is shown in the Figure below.  The Government/ Commercial category is forecast to maintain its market leadership role during the forecast period.  There are many different sources of energy (coal, nuclear, natural gas, hydro, oil), therefore, the use of wind turbine-based products, as well as other alternative or renewable energy solutions (naturally replenished) are constantly striving to serve the needs of consumers.

The Residential category also includes “other” applications, which typically fall under the non-specific group based mostly on the web-based sale channels or other distribution channel where it often difficult to ascertain the final user-group of the product. 

Thursday, August 2, 2012

SCHOTT Solar wins CSP Today Award

• Recognized in the category “CSP Technology and Supplier”
• Advanced CSP receivers from SCHOTT Solar offer higher efficiency and long-term stability

SCHOTT Solar was honored for the second year in a row in the United States by winning the “CSP Technology and Supplier Award.” SCHOTT Solar CSP accepted this honor at the annual U.S. conference of CSP Today in Las Vegas at the end of June. The award confirms that concentrating solar thermal receivers from SCHOTT Solar play a key role in increasing the efficiency of modern solar power plants. Furthermore, they contribute to cost reductions and the long-term success of Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plant technology thanks to their outstanding design. SCHOTT Solar CSP’s further development and improvement of the SCHOTT PTR® 70 receivers continue to set new standards in the area of efficiency and long-term stability.

“We are delighted at being voted CSP Technology Supplier of the Year; this honor clearly underscores our high standard for quality at SCHOTT Solar. In addition, this honor once again confirms that the market views us as an innovative force in the area of receiver technology,” commented Christoph Fark, Managing Director of SCHOTT Solar CSP.

The receiver – the heart of a solar power plant
Vacuum-insulated receivers in CSP power plants convert the con-centrated rays of the sun into heat that is used initially to produce steam and then to generate electricity inside a steam turbine. The question of how much solar radiation the receivers are able to convert into heat plays a key role in the efficiency of these sys-tems. Thanks to a new coating, SCHOTT Solar has now managed to increase the degree of absorption to over 95.5 percent. At the same time, thermal radiation has been reduced to less than 9.5 percent. A further increase in absorption capacity was achieved by designing the ends of the receivers in a new way and expanding the active surface to 96.7 percent of the entire length, but also by using optional new reflectors on the ends of the receivers.

Besides performance, the durability of receivers is also of im-mense importance to the economic success of a solar thermal power plant. SCHOTT Solar developed noble gas capsules that can be integrated into the vacuum area of the receivers and be opened at any time later on during operation of the power plant as a way of reducing heat losses even after many years of operation. The noble gas helps keep heat losses permanently low and allows for the receivers to continue operating at high efficiency levels.

“Solar power can be generated even more economically in the future thanks to our new generation of receivers. By again con-tributing to lower costs of this core technology, we will also be able to ensure the continued growth of this important industry. Today, CSP power plants already offer a genuine alternative to conven-tional fossil fuel-based power plants,” Fark explains.

CSP technology will also be used in the “Power From the Desert” project Desertec. The goal of the industrial initiative Dii is to cover around 20 percent of Europe's electrical power needs by the year 2050 by relying on imports from North Africa. This would enable Europe to lower its electricity costs by about 40 percent. The very first wind and solar power plants with 250 megawatts of power in total are scheduled to be built soon in Morocco and should begin supplying power starting in 2014.

About the CSP Today Award


CSP Today is an independent company that provides the CSP industry with a platform for exchanging information on technolo-gies and new market developments. CSP Today has been award-ing prizes and recognizing special achievements since 2009.

Source Link:  http://www.us.schott.com/english/news/press_releases.html?NID=456

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

Develop New Technology for Grid-Level Electrical Energy Storage

PHILADELPHIA, July 10, 2012

The electrochemical flow capacitor technology, developed at Drexel, could be a solution to using renewable energy sources such as wind and solar power.
In the aftermath of the recent United Nations Rio+20 Conference on Sustainable Development, the focus of many industrialized nations is beginning to shift toward planning for a sustainable future. One of the foremost challenges for sustainability is efficient use of renewable energy resources, a goal that hinges on the ability to store this energy when it is produced and disburse it when it is needed.

A team of researchers from Drexel University’s College of Engineering has taken up this challenge and have developed a new method for quickly and efficiently storing large amounts of electrical energy.

The Challenge of Renewable Energy

Electrical energy storage is the obstacle preventing more widespread use of renewable energy sources such as wind and solar power. Due to the unpredictable nature of wind and solar energy, the ability to store this energy when it is produced is essential for turning these resources into reliable sources of energy. The current U.S. energy grid system is used predominantly for distributing energy and allows little flexibility for storage of excess or a rapid dispersal on short notice.

The Drexel’s team of researchers is putting forward a plan to integrate into the grid an electrochemical storage system that combines principles behind the flow batteries and supercapacitors that power our daily technology.

Existing Technology

Batteries store a large amount of energy, but are relatively slow in discharging it and they have a limited lifespan, or cycle-life, than their counterparts – electrochemical capacitors, which are commonly called “supercapacitors” or “ultracapacitors.”

Conventional supercapacitors provide a high power output with minimal degradation in performance for as many as 1,000,000 charge-discharge cycles. The capacitor can rapidly store and discharge energy, but only in small amounts compared to the battery.

The obstacle in the way of using either a battery or a supercapacitor to store energy in the grid is that energy storage ability is inextricably tied to the size of the battery or the supercapacitor being used. Supercapacitors, similar to lithium-ion batteries, are manufactured in fairly small cells ranging in size from a coin to a soda can. Large amounts of expensive material, such as metal current collectors, polymer separators and packaging, would be required to construct a battery or supercapacitor of the size necessary to function effectively in the energy grid.

“Packing together thousands of conventional small devices to build a system for large-scale stationary energy storage is too expensive,” said Dr. Yury Gogotsi, director of the A.J. Drexel Nanotechnology Institute and the lead researcher on the project. “A liquid storage system, the capacity of which is limited only by the tank size, can be cost-effective and scalable.”

A Grid Energy Storage Solution
The team’s research yielded a novel solution that combines the strengths of batteries and supercapacitors while also negating the scalability problem. The “electrochemical flow capacitor” (EFC) consists of an electrochemical cell connected to two external electrolyte reservoirs - a design similar to existing redox flow batteries which are used in electrical vehicles. 

This technology is unique because it uses small carbon particles suspended in the electrolyte liquid to create a slurry of particles that can carry an electric charge.

Uncharged slurry is pumped from its tanks through a flow cell, where energy stored in the cell is then transferred to the carbon particles. The charged slurry can then be stored in reservoirs until the energy is needed, at which time the entire process is reversed in order to discharge the EFC.
The main advantage of the EFC is that its design allows it to be constructed on a scale large enough to store large amounts of energy, while also allowing for rapid disbursal of the energy when the demand dictates it.
“By using a slurry of carbon particles as the active material of supercapacitors, we are able to adopt the system architecture from redox flow batteries and address issues of cost and scalability,” Gogotsi said
In flow battery systems, as well as the EFC, the energy storage capacity is determined by the size of the reservoirs, which store the charged material. If a larger capacity is desired, the tanks can simply be scaled up in size. Similarly, the power output of the system is controlled by the size of the electrochemical cell, with larger cells producing more power.

“Flow battery architecture is very attractive for grid-scale applications because it allows for scalable energy storage by decoupling the power and energy density,” said Dr. E.C. Kumbur, director of Drexel’s Electrochemical Energy Systems Laboratory. “Slow response rate is a common problem for most energy storage systems. Incorporating the rapid charging and discharging ability of supercapacitors into this architecture is a major step toward effectively storing energy from fluctuating renewable sources and being able to quickly deliver the energy, as it is needed.”

This design also gives the EFC a relatively long usage life compared to currently used flow batteries. According to the researchers, the EFC can potentially be operated in stationary applications for hundreds of thousands of charge-discharge cycles.

“This technology can potentially address cost and lifespan issues that we face with the current electrochemical energy storage technologies,” Kumbur said.

“We believe that this new technology has important applications in [the renewable energy] field,” said Dr. Volker Presser, who was an assistant research professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the time the initial work was done. “Moreover, these technologies can also be used to enhance the efficiency of existing power sources, and improve the stability of the grid.”

This concept for energy storage was recently published in a special issue of Advanced Energy Materials focused on next-generation batteries. The team’s ongoing work is focused on developing new slurry compositions based on different carbon nanomaterials and electrolytes, as well as optimizing their flow capacitor design. The group is also designing a small demonstration prototype to illustrate the fundamental operation of the system.

“We have observed very promising performance so far, being close to that of conventional packaged supercapacitor cells,” Gogotsi said. “However, we will need to increase the energy density per unit of slurry volume by an order of magnitude, and achieve it using very inexpensive carbon and salt solutions to make the technology practical.”

Source Link: http://www.drexel.edu/now/news-media/releases/archive/2012/July/Engineers-Develop-New-Grid-Level-Energy-Storage-Technology/

Friday, June 29, 2012

California Utility to Measure Photovoltaics’ Effect on the Power Grid

GridSense, an Acorn Energy Company, Partners with California Utility to Measure Photovoltaics’ Effect on the Power Grid


Sacramento, CA – June 28, 2012 ‐ GridSense, an Acorn Energy (NASDAQ: ACFN) company that develops and markets advanced monitoring solutions for the electric power industry, has announced that a California utility will use its LineIQTM solution to measure the impact of photovoltaic (PV) generated power as it enters the utility grid.

Many states are mandating increases in the percentage of power generated from renewables. California has implemented a law requiring utilities to procure 33% of their electricity from eligible renewable energy sources by 2020, of which solar will comprise a significant part.

As more and more solar comes online, however, utilities are grappling with its disruptive effects on the grid. Non‐renewable power sources are relatively constant. They are very predictable and rarely impacted by time of day, season, or hour‐to‐hour changes in weather conditions. That is not the case with PVs. PV capacity is different in summer than it is in winter. In volatile weather, it can change significantly on an hour‐by‐hour, or even minute‐by‐minute basis.

“Loading is a particular concern as PVs enter the grid,” says Brandy Henson, GridSense Sales Manager. “Grappling with significant power fluctuations challenges traditional utility models. It demands a more fluid and flexible smart grid control mechanism. To accomplish that, you need extensive, reliable monitoring.

The California utility is using LineIQTM monitoring system on distribution lines surrounding PVs to gauge their impact as they feed the grid. Monitoring will focus on fluctuations at different times of day, and due to sun and weather conditions. For this application, LineIQTM has been programmed to sample every two seconds to ensure a truly high‐resolution view of line conditions over time.

With its ability to monitor lines up to 138kV, self‐powered design, and accommodation of any communications protocol, the unit is uniquely qualified for this type of high‐intensity monitoring. Considering the worldwide emphasis on integrating PV and other renewables into the grid, GridSense anticipates an increase in the demand for renewable energy source monitoring.

“We’re thrilled that utilities are continuing to recognize the value and versatility of the LineIQTM monitoring solution,” says Henson.

“The ability to monitor higher voltage lines, the depth of intelligent data it collects, and its aptitude for extremely high‐intensity sampling make it a perfect tool to help utilities seamlessly integrate more renewables into their network.”

About GridSense Inc.
GridSense is a smart grid technology company dedicated to providing innovative, practical and cost effective monitoring solutions to the electric power industry. Utilizing in‐depth industry knowledge and understanding of utility requirements, we provide technology and services that help the industry address the limitations of old and aging infrastructure. We apply experience and technical know how with new insight and ideas to create intelligent, reliable and leading edge technologies that add value to our customers and
shape the future of the modern electrical power system.

Source Link: http://www.acornenergy.com/rsc/articles/news-366.pdf